Another Perspective on Design – Symposium

Yesterday, an interesting symposium was organised in Breda by COLIN (Creative Organisations Linked in Networks) , named “Another Perspective on Design“. Here are some notes I took during the presentations. They are not comprehensive, but should capture some of the highlights.


Speaker: Mary-Ann Schreurs, chairwoman of the working group Design of the Eindhoven city council

  • Design has enormous economic potential
    • One reason DAF trucks has become so succcessful is because of their truck cabins having been optimally designed for their human users.
  • Designers bring together ideas from all disciplines, combine them into a form. Design is leading.
  • Governments need to create the necessary conditions for design to have its effect.
    • For example, never enough workspaces for starting entrepreneurs!
  • Innovation networks necessary
    • Alone it cannot be done, collaboration between many stakeholders is essential. Only organize those who are really willing.
    • Companies are proud of their products because they mean something to people
      • No longer make products just to own, but products that add meaning to people’s lives.
      • For example, children in hospital get badge, when moving around the kids see their favorite themes. projected on the walls, e.g. space travel. Result: faster recovery time.

    “Designer is a carrier of societal change”

  • A design meeting was organized for city politicians: what’s in design for them? Some examples:
    • Participation is the magic word. One approach that has been shown to work in Eindhoven is the “virtual neighbourhood”.
    • Software for 3D design. Use it to show the effects of construction choices, costs automatically calculated. Design of houses much more tailored to needs of citizens, they co-own the design.
    • Designers living with homeless found out that they do not use the designed shelters if their dogs are not allowed entry, as these to them are “their family”.
    • The city council now better understands the power of design for the city. A range of aspects needs to be taken into account:
      • Esthetics
      • Economics
      • Societal
      • “Freedom”
        • Large companies often constrain the creative process too much. Technology should not lead but serve us. Make sure to liberate creative souls to work in the way they want/need.
  • Eindhoven is going to change from a city that creates technology to a city where you experience it.

Speaker: Conny Bakker, director of consultancy company Info-Eco, co-author of ‘Trespassers, inspirations for eco-efficient design’ and author of ‘Sustainable Technological Development’.

  • Info-Eco: helps designers and entrepreneurs choose the most appropriate eco-design strategies for their products and services.
  • For example: “peak oil”, oil shortage very soon becoming major problem
  • Design can help to achieve hyperefficiency
    • e.g. Volkswagen has prototype car using 1 liter of gas per 100 km. Will be on the market in 2010
    • Zero emission house using an advanced pipe system.
    • Airquarium: inflatable building, can be transported easily, using air as construction material
    • XO laptop (One Laptop Per Child). Many efficiency features, needs only 2 W! Rwanda and Uruguay have already bought it, among other nations, positive experiences reported from the field.
    • Zooop electrical car can reach 180 km/h, what can we learn for mass car design?
    • Nokia Eco Sensor Cell Phone: is charged by body movements of user

Speaker: Thera van Osch, economist and chairwoman of the Association for the Care Economy

  • From knowledge economy to experience economy, in which empathy is important
  • Does the economy determine design, or can design change the economy?
  • Increasing monetization of everything, including design! Not good, inhibiting real innovation!
  • We need to develop a paradigm of the caring human being
  • Achieve balance between market economy and care economy
  • Can sustainable design contribute to the economy in economical , social, and ecological sense?

Speaker: Alex van Dierendonck, O2 Nederland

  • User interface design & sustainability: involve the user
  • O2: growing network of designers together involved in developing innovative sustainable solutions. O2 Netherlands, the Dutch branch, has been founded in 1993.
  • Examples of innovative solutions
  • Focus on products doesn’t show the complex processes needed to get there!
  • Together doing design sessions is an interesting added value of such a design network.

Speakers: Stella van Himbergen, programme manager DDiD and Robert Nijhout, graphics design specialist who volunteered for the FairMail project

  • DDiD: Dutch Design in Development, couples Dutch designers to small producers in developing countries.
  • Stimulate sustainable economic development in developing countries.
  • DDiD supports the whole process, is a matchmaker, works towards realizing fairer social and environmental values.
  • Aims for unique product development
  • Example project: FairMail, Peru
    • Municipal waste dump. Many people living and working there in very poor and unhealthy conditions.
    • FairMail organizes photography courses to the kids, by volunteers from all over the world. The photos are sold as postcards (“cards with perspective”) in Peru and the North, leading to sustainable income for the locals. Revenues are split by local community and the individual photographers. Part of the revenues are used for education and health insurance funds for the whole community. The good thing is it stimulates the economy of everybody, from the individual, through the community to the local economy.
    • DDiD provided templates and training (in, for instance, Indesign publishing software) to allow them to produce independently. E.g. photo processing training for the FairMail kids.
    • Good example of “social design” by providing the community with the means to themselves improve their own future.
    • Issue: how to “train the trainers” in order to scale up the impact of such programmes?

Second Life: Beyond the Hype

The hype is over. Whereas only a year ago, Second Life was everywhere in the mainstream media, the mad rush seems over. Then, every major organization seemed to try to establish a presence “in world”, and the virtual sky seemed the limit. Now, the number of active users seems to have stabilized, and many initially over-enthusiasts are disappointed, because their unrealistic expectations have not been met.

However, the dot com bust around the turn of the century did not kill the development of worthwhile applications of the Internet, on the contrary. Similarly, the current stage in the evolution of Second Life from mere vision to serious business, educational, and many other applications is a natural one. Consolidation and reflection on where to go from here is healthy and necessary. Issues to be worked on include tool systems and (workflow) process models.

For a nice glimpse into already existing “useful” applications of Second Life, check out Wagner James Au’s list in his “Second Life: Hype vs. Anti-Hype vs. Anti-Anti Hype” post:

He’d see applications in, for example, retail shopping (as here), online gaming and entertainment (as here and here), data visualization (as here), national security (as here), international relations (as here), non-profit fundraising (as here), architecture (as here), scientific simulation (as here), education (as here and here), and therapy (as here); just ten industries worth billions of dollars, which could potentially impact hundreds of millions of Internet users, quickly culled from my bookmark cache– and that’s not even mentioning the as-yet-unproven applications which have already gained traction, like in-world celebrity appearances (as here), political activism (as here and here), and marketing/brand promotion (as here.)

One particularly interesting use I have experienced myself is as a venue for cyberconferencing.

Virtual Teams and Collaborative Environments – book

CALL FOR CHAPTERS
Proposals Submission Deadline: 3/31/2008
Full Chapters Due: 7/31/2008
Virtual Teams and Collaborative Environments:
Knowledge-Driven Creativity

A book edited by A book edited by Aggelos Liapis, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
Julian Malins, The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland UK
Stijn Christiaens, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
Pieter De Leenheer, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

http://www.igi-pub.com/requests/details.asp?ID=371

OBJECTIVES
One of the principal objectives of this new book is to suggest improved tools and methodologies for CSCW which can be applied in a variety of disciplines and professional contexts. The book will explore the nature of creativity and how this relates to CSCW. In particular this book will identify the factors that limit creativity in virtual teams when using online collaborative environments.

The overall objectives of the book are as follows:

  • To develop a clear understanding of the use of ontologies as an approach to developing computer supported collaborative working systems within the areas of creativity and design.
  • To identify creative approaches for supporting ontology engineering.
  • To develop the possible uses for collaborative environments that can be used to assist creative communities.
  • To provide insights that support virtual teams, communities and associated ontologies.
  • To examine the future developments in CSCW, focusing on collaborative environments.
  • To demonstrate the advantages of using collaborative environments in order to increase productivity.

5th Prato Community Informatics & Development Informatics Conference 2008

5th Prato Community Informatics & Development Informatics Conference 2008: ICTs for Social Inclusion: What is the Reality?

27 OCTOBER-30 OCTOBER 2008, MONASH CENTRE, PRATO ITALY.

FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS
We are seeking abstracts and proposals from academics, practitioners and PhD students for a conference and workshop event at the Monash University Centre, Prato, Italy (near Florence). The Conference will also include a development informatics stream under the aegis of the International Development Informatics Association as part of its second conference meeting.

Click here for more information.

Virtual worlds are not enough

I had an interesting conversation yesterday with Philippe Kerremans, who through his Louis Platini company is implementing Second Life business solutions. We agreed that building virtual worlds in, for example, Second Life is not enough. Additional necessary conditions are an accompanying website in “ordinary cyberspace” and process models that can be used to ensure that available functionalities are actually being used by community members in all their various roles.

IADIS International Conference Web Based Communities 2008

IADIS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE WEB BASED COMMUNITIES 2008

Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 24 to 26 July 2008

(http://www.webcommunities-conf.org/)

part of the IADIS Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems

(MCCSIS 2008)

Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 22 to 27 July 2008

(http://www.mccsis.org)

* Conference background and goals

The mission of this conference is to publish and integrate scientific results and act catalytically to the fast developing culture of web communities. The conference invites original papers, review papers, technical reports and case studies on WWW in particular the emerging role of so-called WWW-Based Communities.

Ontology Management book

M. Hepp, P. De Leenheer, A. de Moor, Y. Sure, eds. (2008). Ontology Management: Semantic Web, Semantic Web Services, and Business Applications, Semantic Web and Beyond: Computing for Human Experience series, Springer Verlag, Berlin, ISBN 978-0-387-69899-1

has just been published. It contains a set of state-of-the-art chapters of ontology management. An interesting observation is that concepts like evolution and communities are starting to be seen as core elements of successful ontology management. The very formal and informal semantic worlds are finally starting to meet.

Besides having been a co-editor, I have also been a co-author of one of the book chapters:

S. Christiaens, P. De Leenheer, A. de Moor, and R. Meersman (2008). Ontologising Competencies in an Interorganisational Setting. In M. Hepp, P. De Leenheer, A. de Moor, and Y. Sure (eds.), Ontology Management: Semantic Web, Semantic Web Services, and Business Applications, Springer, Berlin, pp.265-288. ISBN 978-0-387-69899-1.

It contains a description of the DOGMA-MESS (Meaning Evolution Support System) I worked on while at STARLab, and is all about the interaction between formal semantics and the living communities of human beings involved in their definition and use. Good stuff 🙂